The University of Southampton

ECS Women in Engineering

Throughout Electronics and Computer Science (ECS), women are carrying out ground-breaking work in academic and industrial research and inspiring the next generation to discover the amazing career opportunities available to girls in these exciting fields.

Meet some of the academics and students in Electronics and Computer Science and find out what inspired them to study and undertake a career in engineering.

Professor Dame Wendy Hall, Professor of Computer Science

Professor Dame Wendy Hall
Professor Dame Wendy Hall

One of the first computer scientists to undertake serious research in multimedia and hypermedia, she has been at its forefront ever since. The influence of her work has been significant in many areas including digital libraries, the development of the Semantic Web, and the emerging research discipline of Web Science.

She is the UK's only Regius Professor in Computer Science and is leading a major review of Artificial Intelligence for the UK Governmnent.

Olivia Ojuroye, PhD in Smart Textiles for Wearable Technology and Industrial Applications

Olivia Ojuroye
Olivia Ojuroye

“In the future I would like to craft my career around my PhD research and the skills I gained from my undergraduate degree. I feel that the smart textiles and wearable technology fields are going to increase in their international reputation, academic credibility, and commercial appeal during the next ten years and I would like to contribute to that either as an expert consultant, by forming my own business or working with or for a business that has the same work/life ethos and ambitions as me. In the long-term I would like to be a key influencer, contributor and disruptor in the smart textiles industry - to be a voice of the industry.”

Read more about Olivia here.

Rebekah Endersby, Electromechanical Engineering student

Rebekah Endersby
Rebekah Endersby

My study focuses on power engineering. Renewable energies are becoming an ever-increasing presence in our electricity network so it is important that power engineering is studied to ensure that power systems evolve with the changes in generation. I would love to see the gender gap in engineering shift as more girls consider maths and physics as a rewarding and exciting career prospect. After graduation I would like to promote Engineering and see applications to study it at degree increase from both genders."

Read more about Rebekah here.

Dr Reena Pau, Outreach Coordinator

Reena Pau
Reena Pau

After her BSC in Information Technology in Organisations, Reena stayed on in ECS to do a PhD focusing on computer science experience and how get girls into computing.

She has been Coordinator of women’s networking group Theano, a research fellow, and is now Outreach Coordinator for ECS, winning a Women in Science, Engineering and Technology (WiSET) Award for increasing the visibility of women in STEM.

Wen Yee Tey, Electrical and Electronic Engineering student

Wen Yee Tey
Wen Yee Tey

Wen Yee spent the first two years of her degree at the University's Malaysia campus and the final two years of her studies are in Southampton. Her current focus is on modelling solar cells. She says, "I have great interest in solar cells. I want to improve the current solar cell efficiency and bring the technology to Malaysia to make good use of the sufficient sunlight which is available all year round. By doing so, environmental issues like global warming can be reduced."

Read more about Wen Yee here.

How ECS helps promote women in science and engineering

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